Book: Raising a Thinking Child by Myrna Shure



I recently read Raising a Thinking Child by Myrna Shure and would recommend it to anybody who has had to referee between two arguing children.

Working with children as young as three, Myrna has demonstrated that if children can solve everyday interpersonal problems for themselves, they are less likely to be impulsive, insensitive, aggressive, . . . → Read More: Book: Raising a Thinking Child by Myrna Shure

What do you want for your children?

Following my post about parents setting their own standards rather than being driven by others’ expectations, I’ve been giving some thought as to what my goals are as a parent and what I’m hoping to achieve. I’m guessing that if you asked most parents what they want for their children, the most common response would . . . → Read More: What do you want for your children?

Is striving to be perfect the answer after all?

A survey published last week on the UK website Netmums suggests that parents feel such pressure to be perfect that they lie to one another. The answer often given to this type of finding is to encourage parents to lower their expectations of themselves. But is this really the best way to help them cope . . . → Read More: Is striving to be perfect the answer after all?

How children give parents the power to change

At this time of year, many people are contemplating the changes they want to make to their lives over the next year. It was perhaps with this in mind that I came across a study by Jennifer Silva and Allison Pugh from the University of Virginia. Their research focused on the way that children enhance . . . → Read More: How children give parents the power to change

Beyond Santa Claus – Parenting By Lying

If you asked parents about the values that they would like to instil in their children, I would guess that honesty would be fairly need the top of the list. Certainly in western countries, honesty is a highly prized value and there is broad disapproval when people lie. You might expect that given this emphasis . . . → Read More: Beyond Santa Claus – Parenting By Lying

Lessons learned from lunch boxes

Sometimes, when I’m doing my research for Evidence Based Mummy, I come across an article that just draws me to it. They’re not necessarily the biggest or most important studies, nor do they always have the most startling results, but they grab my attention. A study by an Australian team looking at the contents of . . . → Read More: Lessons learned from lunch boxes

If money isn’t directly related to children’s development,what is?

I published a post a couple of weeks ago looking at the impact of a family’s income on children’s development. Analysing information from 19,000 families, the researchers measured children’s development at three ages: 9 months, 3 years and 5 years. They also gathered data on the family’s income as well as information on a range . . . → Read More: If money isn’t directly related to children’s development,what is?

Happy after all? Parenting and life satisfaction.

In the last few months, the happiness of parents or, to be more accurate the lack of it, has received considerable attention in the media. Contrary to many parents’ perceptions, most research to date has concluded becoming a mother or a father reduces people’s happiness rather than increases it. So what’s going on? Why do . . . → Read More: Happy after all? Parenting and life satisfaction.

Are there five core capabilities for parents?

I recently came across an interesting article by Joan Grusec of the University of Toronto and Maayan Davidov of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In an attempt to reconcile the contradictory theories that exist about parenting, Grusec and Davidov propose adopting what they call a domain approach to the process of parenting. They argue that . . . → Read More: Are there five core capabilities for parents?

Does money matter when raising children?

Does money matter when raising children? First appearances would suggest that the income of the family has a bearing on a child’s development. A range of studies over the last decade have found that pre-school age children coming from families with limited financial resources tend to be at greater risk of having behavioural and intellectual . . . → Read More: Does money matter when raising children?